Mass Times

SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Saturday - 5:30 pm - St. Mary's
Sunday - 8:00 am - St. Joseph's
Sunday - 9:00 am - Holy Trinity
Sunday - 10:00 am - St. Mary's
Sunday - 11:30 am - St. Mary's (Latin)

WEEKDAY SCHEDULE
Tuesday - 8:00 am - St. Mary's
Wednesday - 8:30 am - St. Joseph's
Thursday - 11:00 am - Pleasantview Home
Friday - 8:00 am - St. Mary's

EUCHARISTIC ADORATION
Wednesday - 12:30 pm - St. Mary's
Wednesday - 5:30 pm - St. Mary's

(The times listed above are the regularly scheduled times. Please double-check the schedule inside the bulletin as times are subject to change.)

Bulletins


  • Sun, Jul 23rd

  • Sun, Jul 16th
Older Publications »

Office Hours

Tue 9am-noon, 1pm-5pm
Wed 9am-noon, 1pm-5pm
Thu 9am-noon, 1pm-5pm
Fri 9am-noon

Victim Assistance

To report child sexual abuse, contact the Iowa Department of Human Services Child Abuse Hotline: 1-800-362-2178 and if it involves clergy or church personnel, also notify Alicia Owens, Victim Assistance Coordinator: 563-349-5002, PO Box 232, Bettendorf IA 52722-0004, vacdav@attglobal.net

Bible Search

Advanced search

Announcements

Eucharistic Adoration is available at 12:30pm and 5:30pm every Wednesday at St. Mary's in Riverside.  The Eucharist will be exposed for about 45 minutes and you can come at any time.

Pope Francis' survey for 16-29 year olds:
https://survey-synod2018.glauco.it/limesurvey/index.php/147718

Staff

Treasures from our Tradition

      Two centuries ago, Archbishop John Carroll worried that Americans would not appreciate the linguistic veil over our worship, and asked that the liturgy in the new United States be in English, not Latin. How did our liturgy come to be in Latin in the first place? In the first century, the dominant language in the regions where the church first flourished was Greek. Today in much of the world, almost everyone speaks at least a bit of English. Recently, the European Union even considered making English its official language, a curious proposal since only two English-speaking countries are members.

      Just as English is a unifying language today, it was hard to function in the ancient world without a smattering of Greek. Even the word “Eucharist” comes from the Greek for “thanksgiving.” For a long time, Greek was the language of worship, even in Rome. Slowly, society in the west shifted to a bias for Latin and against Greek. Latin first appeared in public prayer at the end of the second century, in the colonial outposts of North Africa. Soon, Latin became the language of culture, and so as fixed prayer forms were written, they were transmitted in Latin. From Rome and Africa, over the next four centuries, the new liturgical language of Latin spread north to Gaul and Britain.

—Rev. James Field, Copyright © J. S. Paluch Co.

Photos

News

In latest appointments, Pope names new members of Roman Rota

Vatican City, Jul 20, 2017 / 06:15 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Fr. Pierangelo Pietracatella and Fr. Hans-Peter Fischer are the newest members of the Roman Rota, and mark the latest in a string of appointments Pope Francis has made this summer as part of his ongoing effort to restructure the Roman Curia.

Hailing from the northern Italian diocese of Toronta, Fr. Pietracatella, a member of the Rota, has been named as its new Chief of Office.

Read More

Bishops to Trump: Don't abandon young people to deportation

Washington D.C., Jul 20, 2017 / 06:01 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Undocumented young people brought to the U.S. by their parents contribute to American society and deserve continued protections from the Trump administration, said the U.S. Catholic bishops this week.

“These young people entered the U.S. as children and know America as their only home. The dignity of every human being, particularly that of our children and youth, must be protected,” Bishop Joe S. Vasquez of Austin, Texas said July 18.

Read More

Is the single life a vocation? Maybe we're asking the wrong question.

Denver, Colo., Jul 20, 2017 / 03:02 am (CNA/EWTN News).- From a young age, Catholics are taught to pray about and discern their vocations – whether they're called to marriage, to the religious life, to the priesthood, or consecrated single life.  

This can leave the lay single person feeling that they are in a vocational limbo of sorts, and it's become a topic of much heated and emotional debate in the Catholic blogosphere: have these people missed their vocation? Is the lay single state, chosen or by default, a vocation?

Read More